Parkhurst, university release food guidelines

Claire Murray | Photo Editor Students gather on Academic Walk for the annual Duquesne Expo, where freshmen can learn about the many student organizations on campus. In the past, many groups offerred food at their tables. This year, they had new rules to follow.

Claire Murray | Photo Editor
Students gather on Academic Walk for the annual Duquesne Expo, where freshmen can learn about the many student organizations on campus. In the past, many groups offerred food at their tables. This year, they had new rules to follow.

By Brandon Addeo | The Duquesne Duke

The good news? Campus bake sales can continue. The bad news? Grilling up hot dogs to sell on A-Walk will now require some paperwork.

Last week, Duquesne University and Parkhurst Dining introduced a new set of catering guidelines for any food served or sold on campus by student organizations or other groups.

While several exceptions are in place, any organization wanting to serve food or beverages at an event must receive written permission from Duquesne’s catering department in the Student Union.

Some exceptions, which do not require approval, include foods prepared by Parkhurst, foods prepackaged for resale and foods pre-approved from a list.

Potlucks also do not require approval, given that the organizing group does not ask for admission or donations and does not advertise the event to the public, according to the policy.

According to Scott Richards, Duquesne’s executive director of auxiliary services, the new rules comply with the university’s contracts with Parkhurst DIning and Pepsi Bottling. The guidelines also follow state and local regulations about food handling.

Although the policy requires student organizations to buy certain products and catering items solely from Parkhurst Dining, Richards said this is not an attempt by Parkhurst to make more money.

“Parkhurst is not expecting additional revenue as a result of this policy,” Richards said.

Grilling now has additional restrictions on it. Written permission is required, and students can no longer cook up hamburgers and hot dogs near building intake vents or the Mellon Hall patio.

All tables serving food must have a sign which reads “these food items may contain nut products or other allergens.”

Several items pre-approved under TAP 51 include donuts, coffee, soft pretzels and popcorn. Groups can still provide pizza, chips and drinks at meetings, a popular way to attract new members or reward existing ones.

Margo DeGenova, president of the Duquesne University Pre-Law Society, said she’s “fine with the rules.

DeGenova was present at one of the organization presidents’ meetings that took place throughout last week, and listened to speakers explain the guidelines, which she calls “reasonable.”

“I don’t think it’s nearly as bad as the rumors going around make it seem,” DeGenova said. “There are a lot of exceptions.”

Rebecca Mickler, Director of the Office of Greek Life, said that Greek organizations will not have to make many changes for big events.

“All of our large-scaled events were already coordinated through Parkhurst, so the new TAP 51 did not really affect us,” Mickler said.

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